Monday, October 9, 2017

Farlight Review



Quick Look:

Info:
Designer: Nick Sibicky
Artists: N/A
Publisher: Game Salute
Year Published: 2017
No. of Players: 2-5
Ages: 12+
Playing Time: 45 minutes

Find more info on BoardGameGeek.com
Being an aerospace engineer and an entrepreneur, you have founded an organization dedicated to exploring unexplored space. Your business is located at Farlight Station, Earth's hub for extraterrestrial enterprise. You have some competition with others trying to complete missions before you and eventually upgrading their ship to go farther into space. You will need to compete with them, making your ship better and being able to explore the unknown before someone else does.



Review:




Rules and Setup:
Setup is pretty straightforward if you follow the rule book. You will need to make sure you place the correct number of parts on the board, depending on how many players are playing the game. You will shuffle and set up missions from lowest to highest, with the top cards being the climactic missions. There will be industry tokens that will help guide you to achieve bonus points at the end of the game. You will determine how many dice icons are on any of the Part cards on the board, roll that many dice, and assign them to those Parts according to numbers, with highest die going on the highest number on the card.
















You will start by bidding. Each player will take their bidding tiles numbered 4, 3, 2, 1, and 0 and take turns placing two at a time face down on the board, either bidding on parts, missions, or facilities. After everyone has placed their bids, you will flip them over and count to see who won by whoever has the highest number. You can also add a crew member to each tile to increase your bid by one. You will set aside the part if you won, and if you lost, for each tile you used, excluding the "0" tile, you receive an extra crew member. The next step is adding the parts onto your ship without turning the card. This can be tricky and require some planning, as you don't want to leave no space to build a bigger ship. Your ship will add parts that will give you more crew, help you discover science, add an engine to your ship (the dice), or change the power of an engine on your ship.

Most of the points will come from discovering the top missions with the most points, in which you will need some powerful engines, maybe enough science, or whatever the mission shows that you will need.



Theme and Mechanics:
The theme works great, as you are trying to get the best parts for the ship, but someone else likely wants the same part. You will have to plan well to fit certain parts on your ship, as it uses a tile placement mechanism where you cannot flip or turn the tile. Sometimes, the tile that gives you more growth to your ship is necessary for you to do well. Since most of the points can be found in the missions, the theme makes total sense, as you want to have the best ship to explore those areas far, far away that no one else has explored yet. The dice in this game still keeps the game strategic.

The game's mechanics seem to be heavy on the bidding mechanic, as that is the majority aspect in doing well. It also adds a bluffing mechanic, as you have a 0 tile, so you can trick people into thinking you are going for a different tile than you really are.





















Artwork and Components:
The art works great, and I love the colors they choose for the game. The names of the organizations are realistic, and each of their logos fit very well with their color. The board is a small board, but since cards are also placed off the board, it helps to make the game big enough for all players to see. I wish the Part cards were a little bigger, though they're probably small because you're laying them in front of you to make a spaceship, and if you had big cards, you could run out of space quickly. The icons are very easy to understand and fit the action they go with. Something they did really nice was that on the back of the instructions, it shows a condensed reference of everything you might need without having to reread the book again.





















The Good:
Bidding and bluffing work very well together. I like the fact that you can add your crew members to a bidding tile to increase your bid. There is enough Part cards on the board to bid on that you will most likely get 1-2 cards, but you can be a little more adventurous and try to win 3-4 as well. The game really comes down to simple rules and doesn't get too confusing after the first round or two. I also like that there are seven different industry awards, and you only use three per game.  This can change strategy with different play-throughs. I also liked that you were constantly thinking about what parts you needed, if those parts would even fit on your ship, or if you need to make space for more parts on you ship.

The Bad:
Again, for me, the Part cards are a little too small. Though the game to me seems pretty simple after learning it, it's harder to explain to others. The game seems like it could handle another aspect to it. This could be a new mechanic, or some other aspect altogether. I expect an expansion in the future.


Final Thoughts:
The game was fun for everyone.  Those who don't like bidding against someone else would bid on their own parts, and those who liked played more boldly would try to outbid others. We really enjoy playing this game, and it seems at the end, you really are trying to beat the other players to that last mission to get you those huge points.

Players Who Like:
I would recommend this game to those who like mid-weight euros. This game would be great for those who love space themes. Also, I would recommend this for those who enjoy building something without too much fighting or opposition from other players.


I am giving Farlight 8 out of 10 super meeples.

8 10

Check out Farlight on:

        

Get your copy of Farlight at your FLGS or online at AMAZON.

About the Author:
Brody Sheard played board games with his large family growing up. He continues his love of games by teaching his family, local gaming guild, and friends about new and exciting games. Brody believes that board gaming keeps your mind healthy while also having fun interacting with others.

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